Pallet Wood quality Question

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jennyjj01
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Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2017 11:09 pm

Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by jennyjj01 »

ForgeCorvus wrote: Tue Apr 02, 2024 6:55 pm If it was my shed I'd remove the roof, unscrew each of the wall frames from the floor and then each other. Then repair and rebuild (with upgrades)..... But then I'd be working on my own with just my dodgy back for company.

Jenny, take loads of pics. I'd love to see how MrJ does this trick
OK. We have a few big chores to do first.
Back in the day, he built it to our (mine really :) ) design based loosely on a B&Q design. Saved a fortune by buying loads of lapped timber and recycling some glass. I think it was something like £150 for materials on what would have been a £500 shed. The big sides are pentagonal with slanted windows. Roof is a weak link being nailed down corrugated plastic, which wouldn't survive removal. We're still contemplating dismantling it and rebuilding properly, but this could turn into a 3 month job and it would not be light work, even for two. We don't want the contents in the rain for too long. This way, he can repair it in stages at his own pace.
Stage one has to be clearing the dirt, soil and tree roots and basal growth which have tumbled around the back and sides. I noticed this week that a tree and some bindweed are growing nicely through the base and sides :)
Graceful Degradation! Prepping's objective summed up in two words. Turning Disaster into Mild Inconvenience by the power of fore-thought

Not Feeling Optimistic. Let me be wrong
grenfell
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Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by grenfell »

If you aim to do the new base in sections you should be able to replace the floor without raising the shed more than a couple of inches. It's basically the same as underpinning a house. Cut the floor in situ then knock in a few wedges to lift the sides up a little leaving a section the size of the pallet without wedges. Cut that section out and replace , then wedge the sides off the new section removing the first wedges and replacing another section of floor . Repeat until the whole floor is replaced . Hope that makes sense. Just a caveat , this does assume the bases of the shed sides are intact and not rotted . They can also be replaced insitu but it's a fiddly job.
grenfell
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Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by grenfell »

Incidentally , perhaps it was this thread and the discussion about slotted screws but this week I had a job to upcycle a couple of tables and consciously made the decision to use slots rather than pozis...
jennyjj01
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Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by jennyjj01 »

grenfell wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 9:17 am Just a caveat , this does assume the bases of the shed sides are intact and not rotted . They can also be replaced insitu but it's a fiddly job.
The bottom of the shed sides ARE rotten! The frame and some of the bottom panels.
So, raising the sides with wedges won't work. Hence the idea of stilts which will be temporarily screwed to the outside and jacks or wedges under them to raise by maybe 3 inches. Then fix up the sides first.

Fiddly diddly.

I like the idea of building the base in sections. An 8' x 6' new base would be far to much to hope to just slip into place. Besides there's fences and raised beds pretty much surrounding the shed. So maybe 4 of sections 4' x 3'. They could then be slid in place from INSIDE the shed before being joined together. There's going to be lots of temporary stages.


Anyhow..... I'm conscious that this is going off topic for a prepping forum. So with apologies, I'm calling this my last word until I, maybe, get invited to post a shed repair gallery
Graceful Degradation! Prepping's objective summed up in two words. Turning Disaster into Mild Inconvenience by the power of fore-thought

Not Feeling Optimistic. Let me be wrong
jansman
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Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by jansman »

jennyjj01 wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 9:40 pm
grenfell wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 9:17 am Just a caveat , this does assume the bases of the shed sides are intact and not rotted . They can also be replaced insitu but it's a fiddly job.
The bottom of the shed sides ARE rotten! The frame and some of the bottom panels.
So, raising the sides with wedges won't work. Hence the idea of stilts which will be temporarily screwed to the outside and jacks or wedges under them to raise by maybe 3 inches. Then fix up the sides first.

Fiddly diddly.

I like the idea of building the base in sections. An 8' x 6' new base would be far to much to hope to just slip into place. Besides there's fences and raised beds pretty much surrounding the shed. So maybe 4 of sections 4' x 3'. They could then be slid in place from INSIDE the shed before being joined together. There's going to be lots of temporary stages.


Anyhow..... I'm conscious that this is going off topic for a prepping forum. So with apologies, I'm calling this my last word until I, maybe, get invited to post a shed repair gallery
From a prepping angle,sheds are important. I’ve only got four now :lol: :lol: . However,maintaining is a regular part of having them.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

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Me.
ForgeCorvus
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Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by ForgeCorvus »

Home repairs, Prepsted maintenance, re/up-cycling and making something out of nothing are part of the basic skillset.

Survivalists stock bullets, Preppers stock nails.
jennyjj01 wrote:"I'm not in the least bit worried because I'm prepared: Are you?"
Londonpreppy wrote: At its core all prepping is, is making sure you're not down to your last sheet of loo roll when you really need a poo.
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Yorkshire Andy
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Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by Yorkshire Andy »

jennyjj01 wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 9:40 pm
grenfell wrote: Wed Apr 03, 2024 9:17 am Just a caveat , this does assume the bases of the shed sides are intact and not rotted . They can also be replaced insitu but it's a fiddly job.
The bottom of the shed sides ARE rotten! The frame and some of the bottom panels.
So, raising the sides with wedges won't work. Hence the idea of stilts which will be temporarily screwed to the outside and jacks or wedges under them to raise by maybe 3 inches. Then fix up the sides first.

Fiddly diddly.

I like the idea of building the base in sections. An 8' x 6' new base would be far to much to hope to just slip into place. Besides there's fences and raised beds pretty much surrounding the shed. So maybe 4 of sections 4' x 3'. They could then be slid in place from INSIDE the shed before being joined together. There's going to be lots of temporary stages.


Anyhow..... I'm conscious that this is going off topic for a prepping forum. So with apologies, I'm calling this my last word until I, maybe, get invited to post a shed repair gallery

Anyone you know got a couple of farm jacks?

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/235494794534 ... kXEALw_wcB

Prise off the lower rotten boards and frame of one wall when you find solid framing add a cross rail on each end between the vertical frame ...

Jack on farm jacks whist you rebuild lower wall section frame then lower and re board
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine
jennyjj01
Posts: 3465
Joined: Sun Jun 04, 2017 11:09 pm

Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by jennyjj01 »

All tips and encouragement gratefully received. None of those jacks available and unfortunately most of the framing is vertical so nothing good to put a jack under.

But the plan is evolving and is now in the advanced early concept stage.

Thanks to those who accept that this adventure fits (tenuously) in a prepping forum. But I'm definitely going to tone down contribution to the thread until there's something worthy of reporting.

In the absence of a jack, we tried lifting an inch with a spade and then with the pallet buster. The latter worked well to lift it an inch :)
Graceful Degradation! Prepping's objective summed up in two words. Turning Disaster into Mild Inconvenience by the power of fore-thought

Not Feeling Optimistic. Let me be wrong
GeeGee
Posts: 367
Joined: Sat Aug 15, 2015 3:35 pm

Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by GeeGee »

Jenny ill join it at the end 😂
Me and hubby moved the entire shed to a new base across the garden a few yr back now and I'm still traumatised !
We levered somehow heaving shoving and kind of pushed it using 4x2 or whatever length wood ...
We started early morning
By night the neighbours had stopped trying to peek out of the curtains and were literally hanging out of windows
We managed it when it was very dark !

A tip
Dismantle the blooming thing ....
grenfell
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Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 7:55 pm

Re: Pallet Wood quality Question

Post by grenfell »

A couple of years ago a customer asked me about moving a couple of sheds , well stable field shelters to be exact. They had to be moved about 200yards so I levered them up and placed round fence posts underneath and with a little bit of help in the muscle department we moved them with relative ease.
Jenny don't worry about jacks . Simply use a length of timber wedged between the ground and the top rail of the frame section. Easier to do it on the inside . Do that on opposing sides and that should take the weight off the end to allow you to repair the bottom of it. Once repaired place some blocks and folding wedges underneath to redistribute the weight and then repeat the process with one side or end at a time. For what it's worth I worked on a row of four or five ( nobody was quite sure) timber framed cottages in Stoneleigh and we had to replace the cill timbers. At one point the whole building was "floating" in that you could look completely through it at ground level , supported on acrow jacks while we waited for delivery of the oak for the new cills.