Investments

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jansman
Posts: 10879
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: Investments

Post by jansman »

grenfell wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 6:47 pm
jansman wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 5:58 pm It does annoy me that if you buy a bike from Argos - in a box- they only have to supply instructions.A cycle shop is liable for injuries, because they actually put it together!
One that always used to get me surrounded chainsaws. It may have changed now I don't know but at one time anyone could go and buy one , no training or anything but to hire one we had to show our chainsaw tickets to prove we were trained and understood the hazards.
Forge I don't know what you posted but I don't seem to be able to open it :(
I believe those chainsaw rules still exist.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.
Arzosah
Posts: 5526
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: Investments

Post by Arzosah »

grenfell wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 6:47 pm Forge I don't know what you posted but I don't seem to be able to open it :(
It looked like a Python member going "Woah, Bicycle Repair Man!" :mrgreen:
grenfell
Posts: 3419
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 7:55 pm

Re: Investments

Post by grenfell »

Ah the Phyton " bicycle repair man" sketch , I remember that one. World full of supermen and one changes to repair bikes. Thanks.
Yorkshire Andy
Posts: 6328
Joined: Thu Oct 03, 2013 4:06 pm

Re: Investments

Post by Yorkshire Andy »

jansman wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 7:12 pm
grenfell wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 6:47 pm
jansman wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 5:58 pm It does annoy me that if you buy a bike from Argos - in a box- they only have to supply instructions.A cycle shop is liable for injuries, because they actually put it together!
One that always used to get me surrounded chainsaws. It may have changed now I don't know but at one time anyone could go and buy one , no training or anything but to hire one we had to show our chainsaw tickets to prove we were trained and understood the hazards.
Forge I don't know what you posted but I don't seem to be able to open it :(
I believe those chainsaw rules still exist.

You can walk out of Lidl with one no questions asked as long as your over 18 :lol:
If your roughing it, Your doing it wrong ;)

Lack of planning on your part doesn't make it an emergency on mine
ForgeCorvus
Posts: 2823
Joined: Fri Feb 08, 2013 11:32 pm

Re: Investments

Post by ForgeCorvus »

Arzosah wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 9:42 pm
grenfell wrote: Mon Dec 20, 2021 6:47 pm Forge I don't know what you posted but I don't seem to be able to open it :(
It looked like a Python member going "Woah, Bicycle Repair Man!" :mrgreen:
Sorry folks..... Sometimes you get the perfect feedline :oops:

BOT
The rules and laws about making or working on certain items is a minefield.
For instance, if I made a load of wooden trunks (or should I say make another load) I could sell them as storage boxes, tool chests, 'rustic' seats, glamping gear or set dressing with no problems. If I were to list "Toy Box" as one of the uses I'd be open to legal repercussions (civil proceedings and/or Trading Standards).
One of the local 'fix-it' men used to do tyres (not new ones, mostly remove/refit, put in tubes and change valves), he stopped because his insurance doubled two years running.
jennyjj01 wrote:"I'm not in the least bit worried because I'm prepared: Are you?"
Londonpreppy wrote: At its core all prepping is, is making sure you're not down to your last sheet of loo roll when you really need a poo.
"All Things Strive" Gd Tak 'Gar
grenfell
Posts: 3419
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 7:55 pm

Re: Investments

Post by grenfell »

Pretty much what my friend was saying. To further rub salt into the wounds we are both members of a facebook wood working group and on there are some who claim to be selling something like a birdbox for anywhere between £60 and £100 .Certainly doesn't seem to be the sort of prices we see near us. Sometime ago between us we made a load of bird houses , planters and so on and took them to a local market and ended up selling a single mallet . The guy next to us had a stall of horseshoe art and sold not a single thing.
I've made boxes or chests and sold them within the re-enactment community and last year made and sold a glastonbury chair , slightly different to the majority and to customer specs , higher back , change to the seat angle and able to be used as a stool and not requiring umpteen wedges to hold it together.. I make some thing on them but frankly not enough to call a living. It's the more mundane that brings in the money. Monday and yesterday i was hanging doors , today it's repairing kitchen cupboards.
To be fair though i was more thinking along the lines of material goods that could rise in value rather than something that gives an income stream. Where i could perhaps make a living repairing bikes would a bike ( perhaps an initially expensive or rare bike or one with some provenance) gain value without me doing anything other than keeping it safe type of thing?
jansman
Posts: 10879
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: Investments

Post by jansman »

grenfell wrote: Wed Dec 22, 2021 7:58 am Pretty much what my friend was saying. To further rub salt into the wounds we are both members of a facebook wood working group and on there are some who claim to be selling something like a birdbox for anywhere between £60 and £100 .Certainly doesn't seem to be the sort of prices we see near us. Sometime ago between us we made a load of bird houses , planters and so on and took them to a local market and ended up selling a single mallet . The guy next to us had a stall of horseshoe art and sold not a single thing.
I've made boxes or chests and sold them within the re-enactment community and last year made and sold a glastonbury chair , slightly different to the majority and to customer specs , higher back , change to the seat angle and able to be used as a stool and not requiring umpteen wedges to hold it together.. I make some thing on them but frankly not enough to call a living. It's the more mundane that brings in the money. Monday and yesterday i was hanging doors , today it's repairing kitchen cupboards.
To be fair though i was more thinking along the lines of material goods that could rise in value rather than something that gives an income stream. Where i could perhaps make a living repairing bikes would a bike ( perhaps an initially expensive or rare bike or one with some provenance) gain value without me doing anything other than keeping it safe type of thing?
I totally get your point.I hold precious metals ,and at the moment I am very much in profit - if I were to sell them- but I won’t,as they are a long term deal. It is quite plain to see that the world is heading towards recession,if not depression. If people get hard up,and I have spare cash,I shall pick up precious metals at the right money.

I have a customer who is an antique dealer ,and she says that business has never been better than now! So if you know anything about antiques…

Of course, there is food. Back in the 2008 crash ,I knew butchers who bought pallet loads of 6lb tins of corned beef. With a 4 year shelf life ,ambient storage ,it was a great deal. Within four years ,corned beef became as rare as rocking horse s*** for six months . Those with foresight did well. On a domestic level ,with inflation as it is,any food bought now ( shelf stable, not frozen- that takes expensive electricity). Basics like pasta and rice are shooting up,and with the looming fuel crisis ,it will get dearer. Bought now,you’ll eat cheaper,later. I love tinned meats ; luncheon meat and the like. For ages,it was a pound a tin.Over the last three years it has increase to £1.29.A 29% increase! And I will eat it anyway. Making money on a commodity is one thing,but money is made to buy stuff.

Just my meandering thoughts.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.
grenfell
Posts: 3419
Joined: Thu Jul 04, 2013 7:55 pm

Re: Investments

Post by grenfell »

I'd heard of the corned beef thing some time ago. In some respects it was the ideal thing to buy , it increased in price better than anything else but if there had been a crash nothing would be lost as it turns into a food store.
It also serves ( in my opinion) to show the difference between several terms that we , and that includes myself , use almost interchangeably , price , worth and value. The value of a tin of corned beef as food doesn't change. That tin in 2008 has the same calories and nutrition as it does now ( by and large) . It's worth is how many meals it can provide which again doesn't really change. It's only price that changes. A DVD might have cost a tenner to begin with , it's value as a storage medium is the same but the price has dropped to a point where they are hard to give away so we say they are worthless or valueless. Hope that makes sense.
jansman
Posts: 10879
Joined: Thu Dec 30, 2010 7:16 pm

Re: Investments

Post by jansman »

grenfell wrote: Wed Dec 22, 2021 6:14 pm I'd heard of the corned beef thing some time ago. In some respects it was the ideal thing to buy , it increased in price better than anything else but if there had been a crash nothing would be lost as it turns into a food store.
It also serves ( in my opinion) to show the difference between several terms that we , and that includes myself , use almost interchangeably , price , worth and value. The value of a tin of corned beef as food doesn't change. That tin in 2008 has the same calories and nutrition as it does now ( by and large) . It's worth is how many meals it can provide which again doesn't really change. It's only price that changes. A DVD might have cost a tenner to begin with , it's value as a storage medium is the same but the price has dropped to a point where they are hard to give away so we say they are worthless or valueless. Hope that makes sense.
That makes sense.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.
Arzosah
Posts: 5526
Joined: Fri Jun 22, 2012 4:20 pm

Re: Investments

Post by Arzosah »

grenfell wrote: Wed Dec 22, 2021 6:14 pm I'd heard of the corned beef thing some time ago. In some respects it was the ideal thing to buy , it increased in price better than anything else but if there had been a crash nothing would be lost as it turns into a food store.
It also serves ( in my opinion) to show the difference between several terms that we , and that includes myself , use almost interchangeably , price , worth and value. The value of a tin of corned beef as food doesn't change. That tin in 2008 has the same calories and nutrition as it does now ( by and large) . It's worth is how many meals it can provide which again doesn't really change. It's only price that changes. A DVD might have cost a tenner to begin with , it's value as a storage medium is the same but the price has dropped to a point where they are hard to give away so we say they are worthless or valueless. Hope that makes sense.
That makes a huge amount of sense, thanks for that.

grenfell also said:
i was more thinking along the lines of material goods that could rise in value rather than something that gives an income stream
I can only think of commodities (for instance, rare earths that will enable a few new pieces of technology to be manufactured - presumably it's very compact, you could store a high value of it for very little space. Or very old technology - a drop spindle or a spinning wheel along with a lesson on how to use them, a solid silver marrow spoon used to get roasted marrow out of long bones. Maps. How to books.

The thing is, what you think will be valuable in the future depends on what you think the future will be like. And I definitely see a long slow collapse. I hope it will be slow enough that the old fashioned skills can spread amongst more of the population, so that the death toll won't be as high. But if you see the future as being influenced by a new technology - nuclear fusion, say, or Elon Musk :? then what you consider to be valuable will be very different.