Cooking during power outage

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jansman
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by jansman »

British Red wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 9:07 pm I'm not sure where this huge fear of carbon monoxide when using a gas stove comes from? I use a four burner, twin oven, propane stove in the kitchen every day. There is no extractor hood or special ventilation and I certainly don't have the windows open when cooking in Winter. Scientifically CO is produced by combustion with inadequate oxygen, but no camping stove could burn as much oxygen as a multi burner domestic gas hob (whether propane or natural gas) so unless your property has inadequate ventilation I can't see it being an issue. Clearly using a barbecue indoors is very dangerous because burning pure carbon in an enclosed space is vey likely to cause CO.
That’s very true! I have often wondered the same thing. Mind you, there’s no shortage of ventilation in our place. :lol:
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.
Frnc
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by Frnc »

GillyBee wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 4:24 pm
Frnc wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 1:38 pm Not stuff like rice that takes 20 minutes to cook.
We always cook rice and pasta when camping using the stored heat. Bring to boil thoroughly. Wrap saucepan up well in a jumper/blanket and leave to one side for about twice as long as usual. While the rice/pasta is cooking, get on and use the single burner to prepare the rest of the meal.
Of course the modern micro-rice sachets are a game changer for camping/emergency cooking. Stir fried rice in the time it takes to fry the egg and some veg.
Yeah the microwave rice is ideal for bug-in. Goes well with those Spice Tailor curries (expensive but amazing). Too heavy for bug-out/backpacking etc. The stored heat method I didn't know about, that's useful to know. It's an extension of the way you prepare freeze dried meals, which are done in the bag. I carry a few heavy duty freezer bags that have folding bottoms so they can stand up, and can take boiling water, so I can split a freeze dried meal over 2 days. For my bugout bag I only carry one pot for cooking and eating out of. It's an 1100ml titanium pot with lid and folding handle. It also has a hanging handle for hanging over a fire. Obviously I'd prefer to just boil water in it. But I'll add a bit of rice to my bugout bag.
Speaking of fires, embers are good for cooking certain things, eg fish, eggs.
Frnc
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by Frnc »

British Red wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 9:07 pm I'm not sure where this huge fear of carbon monoxide when using a gas stove comes from? I use a four burner, twin oven, propane stove in the kitchen every day. There is no extractor hood or special ventilation and I certainly don't have the windows open when cooking in Winter. Scientifically CO is produced by combustion with inadequate oxygen, but no camping stove could burn as much oxygen as a multi burner domestic gas hob (whether propane or natural gas) so unless your property has inadequate ventilation I can't see it being an issue. Clearly using a barbecue indoors is very dangerous because burning pure carbon in an enclosed space is vey likely to cause CO.
My Soto stove has a CO warning. It's probably a pretty minor risk, but it may depend on what you're burning and the device. The backpacking canisters are propane/butane mix. If I was using one in a tent I'd be more concerned about fire.
British Red
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by British Red »

Frnc wrote: Sun Jun 12, 2022 6:39 am
My Soto stove has a CO warning. It's probably a pretty minor risk, but it may depend on what you're burning and the device. The backpacking canisters are propane/butane mix. If I was using one in a tent I'd be more concerned about fire.
I get it, but then I've seen packet of celery with a nut allergy warning. If it bothers anyone a lot, ensure the room is adequately ventilated - which means a window open a bit. If using a gas stove indoors was that dangerous, every chef and restaurant worker eould be long dead - think how many burners are going in a commercial kitchen 😁
GillyBee
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by GillyBee »

Gas is banned in higher rise flats because of the fire risk more than the CO2.
jansman
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by jansman »

We have a big gas range ,so a gas camping stove ( as British Red says) should be no bother. We will be have a new kitchen within the next 12 months. It’s going to be a big job,as it has to be gutted.So already I am planning our cooking / eating / washing facilities as a stop gap. What is our living room will be the pop- up kitchen,and will have two bistro style gas rings in there. I’m not concerned about carbon monoxide,although we do have detectors because of the solid fuel stoves.
In three words I can sum up everything I have learned about life: It goes on.

Robert Frost.

Covid 19: After that level of weirdness ,any situation is certainly possible.

Me.
Frnc
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by Frnc »

British Red wrote: Sun Jun 12, 2022 7:33 am I've seen packet of celery with a nut allergy warning.
Lol!

Yeah, I'm all for health and safety, but if warnings are disproportionate, it can do more harm than good. People end up ignoring them.
British Red
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by British Red »

It's all about context. On a camping stove, it's probably sensible - if the context is using it in a one man tent zipped up tight - in a flat or house the volume of air and ventilation are very different 🙂
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rik_uk3
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Location: South Wales UK

Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by rik_uk3 »

Deeps wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 10:00 am
rik_uk3 wrote: Sat Jun 11, 2022 9:22 am The briefcase cartridge stoves work well but the price of gas is shooting up and butane don't work at 5c or less and a cold house can easily hit those temps and even a cool summer morning temp when camping can kill them.
As you probably know mate, a bit of body heat can warm up gas cans, stick them under your oxter for 5 minutes and it can make a difference.

For what the OP is looking for, I can't see past the briefcase stoves, simple to use and the fuel readily available (if a bit pricier now, but isn't everything).
That will work but as you know not for long, you have to heat all the gas in the canister to benefit; just don't use butane only, get the tri gas ones.
Richard
South Wales UK
Retired, spending the children's inheritance.
Frnc
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Re: Cooking during power outage

Post by Frnc »

With a remote canister stove you can turn the canister upside-down in very cold conditions. Remote stoves are more stable as I mentioned before, and asier to shield from wind as well. Why did I buy a canister top stove? Smaller and lighter weight. My Trangia has remote gas though.

Here's a Soto Fusion Trek
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Last edited by Frnc on Mon Jun 13, 2022 9:44 am, edited 1 time in total.